The Hard Corps Marketing Show
The Buyer’s Cyclonic Journey in 8 Stages - Mike Lieberman - Hard Corps Marketing Show #122

The Buyer’s Cyclonic Journey in 8 Stages - Mike Lieberman - Hard Corps Marketing Show #122

January 27, 2020

Often times when marketing and sales refer to the buyer’s journey, they use a funnel model, moving prospects down the funnel. In today’s society as marketing is touching their buyers in various places, is the funnel still the correct model?

An Author, Marketing Leader, and CEO & Chief Revenue Scientist at Square 2, Mike Lieberman, challenges marketing and sales to expand their mindset of the buyer’s journey to create memorable experiences for them at each stage.

 

Takeaways:

  • The traditional sales funnel has become obsolete to represent the buyer's journey because it implies that the journey is a linear process with gravity, to move the buyer to the next stage. The only thing moving the buyer from stage to stage is your influence on them.
  • A cyclone model infers there is no gravity to move the buyer to the next stage. There is just a series of influences that could potentially throw a prospect out of a stage, get them to the next stage, or make them skip a stage.
  • Business to business marketing and sales teams deal with business to people. Businesses are made of people and people are afraid of change and the unknown. As marketers we have to make buyers feel comfortable enough to get out of the norm of the status quo.
  • The eight stages of the buyer's journey are pre-awareness, awareness, education, consideration, evaluation, rationalization, decision making, and then delivery. 
  • We have to know what questions people are asking at each stage of the buyer’s journey, to structure content that answers those questions.
  • Focus on creating amazing experiences for people as they interact with your brand. What can you do to create an inventory of memorable stories for your prospects, your qualified leads, your customers, and then your referrals?
  • Random Acts of Marketing - When marketing tactics are done without strategy. Focus on the strategy first and answer the question, what are you trying to accomplish? Define the goal, and then decide how much of that goal you are trying to reach.
  • If you want to double your revenue, you need to make sure that your marketing is budgeted and scaled at an appropriate level to make this goal possible.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • The sales funnel is an accurate depiction of the buyer’s journey. - This is no longer the case. A cyclone is a more accurate depiction because the buyer’s journey is not a linear process anymore. We are touching them at all these different touch points which can have the buyer skip to a more advanced stage, or be set back, depending on their experience. 
No Nonsense Marketing Fundamentals - Laura Luckman Kelber - Hard Corps Marketing Show #121

No Nonsense Marketing Fundamentals - Laura Luckman Kelber - Hard Corps Marketing Show #121

January 23, 2020

The Four P’s of Marketing, brand, buyer personas, ABM, empathetic messaging that resonates with your buyers, and networking, this episode has it all.

A marketing strategist, thought leader, and the SVP Marketing at Flexera, Laura Luckman Kelber, shares the fundamentals of marketing and warns marketers about what can happen when you are not focused on executing the fundamentals at an exceptional level. This is one episode that will resonate with all marketers.

 

Takeaways:

  • Being mindful about your branding is being considerate about what your communication conveys and the insight it taps into to be empathetic to your target market. 
  • Your brand needs to be an emotional connection with your buyers.
  • When you multitask, you diminish your focus ability.
  • The four P’s of marketing are product, placement, pricing, and promotion. To be truly effective at marketing you should be impacting all four P’s, however, marketers today have been placed solely in promotion.
  • ABM is personalization, focus, and prioritizing your top market. If you do this well, it will affect your time, money, and resources.
  • Be focused in your marketing. Consider, what is the insight you are driving, who is the target, how do you create a message that resonates, and then how do you scale it?
  • Conducting buyer persona interviews allows you to pinpoint patterns of messaging to use, that is empathetic to your buyers.
  • Career advice from Laura Luckman Kelber - Create time in your calendar at least once a month to network. Build relationships with people that you instantly connect with. Have coffee, a drink, or lunch with someone from a different department. Extend your reach.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • Branding is dead. - Branding is NOT dead. People have less attention and need more shorthand to make decisions. Branding is your shorthand.
The SEO Puzzle Master - Stoney deGeyter - Hard Corps Marketing Show #120

The SEO Puzzle Master - Stoney deGeyter - Hard Corps Marketing Show #120

January 22, 2020

If a visitor came to your website, can they tell the product or service that your company sells just by looking at the navigation or will a visitor have to click through to find what they are looking for?

A Marketing Leader, Speaker, and the Author of The Best Damn Web Marketing Checklist, Period 2.0, Stoney deGeyter, provides clarity for marketers around steps to making your site search engine friendly and search engine optimized. 

This episode covers website navigation best practices, keyword search data collection, and where to start when building a website. Check it out!

 

Takeaways:

  • If you are developing a website, start with the navigation. The navigation sets the tone for the rest of the site. A visitor should be able to tell what your company does from the navigation tabs.
  • The products or services that your company provides should be the focus of your navigation. Most of the time visitors are going to your website to look at your products or services, not your company and core values.
  • Visitors to your site should have to read and dig as little as possible to get to what they need. Make your content accessible to them.
  • When building a site, put in the work and do keyword research. The goal is to find the keywords that buyers are using to describe your product or service. Conduct a search at the core term search level, the higher-level two to three word bucket and then at the deeper phrase level, the questions that people are searching for concerning your product or service. Keywords should be grouped based on intent. What is the visitor searching for?
  • Making sure a site is search engine friendly focuses on using the right HTML markups, schema, and the right headlines.
  • The speed of your site is important and may not even be a problem with the development. Check your website host and see how your speed measures up.
  • When considering where to improve on your website, look at the performance data. What pages are people finding and on what pages are they converting?
  • Advice from Stoney - Everyone is going to get negative reviews, but it is how you handle it that matters.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • One can correlate the terms search engine friendly and search engine optimization as the same thing. - They are NOT the same thing. Search engine friendly deals with the architecture, coding, and making sure that the website is accessible. Search engine optimization focuses on the keywords specifically used in the content and calls to action.

 

The Value of Asking the Right Questions - Kris Bondi - Hard Corps Marketing Show #119

The Value of Asking the Right Questions - Kris Bondi - Hard Corps Marketing Show #119

January 16, 2020

A marketer’s learning never stops. They need to understand their product or service inside and out, they need to understand their buyers, the market their product or service plays in, and also how to report it all. 

In an ever evolving field, marketers face a challenge of keeping up with their knowledge of the space they move in.

An international marketing thought leader, speaker, writer, and CMO of LogDNA, Kris Bondi, encourages marketers to ask questions throughout their career to advance their skills. She reminds listeners that it also is not just about asking questions in general, but asking the right ones.

 

Takeaways:

  • If you do not understand the audience or personas you are working with, then you need to educate yourself by asking the right questions.
  • Marketers need to take initiative and educate themselves on the technical side of their product or service. They need to be the translators between the end users and the business value.
  • Listen in on sales calls and then after the call, meet with the sales team members and ask them why they were asking certain questions. Dig deeper for understanding and learn at every moment you can.
  • A marketing leader not only is concerned with the leads they are bringing in, they also have their minds on the bigger picture. Where is the company going? Is the marketer putting their brand or business in a limited box?
  • In marketing, it is not just about answering a pain your buyer has, but answering a pain that they care about. Is the pain real or is it a nice-to-have improvement?
  • B2B marketers need to consider the different buyers they are marketing to in a deal. Will the person signing the check care about that your product or service makes someone’s life at their company easier? How will your product or service contribute to revenue?
  • When considering attribution, think about not only the lead source, but also focus on what campaigns are triggering the conversion to an opportunity.
  • Before joining a company consider, is there a market opportunity, how much has been invested in the company, what pain points are they solving, and where are they looking to go in the next few years?
  • Kris Bondi’s advice for asking the right follow up questions: “You actually have to listen to what the person said the first time.” A follow up question needs to be related to what the person just said as opposed to just running through a list of predetermined questions.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • You can’t market to developers. - Marketers will not be able to market to developers if they only deliver fluff and pushy messaging. Marketers succeed with developers when they are concerned about the end user. They need to be concerned with empowering them and educating them on how to use the product or service. 

 

The Disruptive Marketer’s Keys to Differentiation - Geoffrey Colon - Hard Corps Marketing Show #118

The Disruptive Marketer’s Keys to Differentiation - Geoffrey Colon - Hard Corps Marketing Show #118

January 13, 2020

In today’s digital world, the latest news, reviews, and competitive insights, are at the buyer’s finger tips instantly. If your business does not stand out from your competitors, how are you going to grab the buyer’s attention?

The Author of Disruptive Marketing, Podcast Host of Disruptive FM, and the Head of Brand Studio, Microsoft Advertising, Geoffrey Colon, challenges marketers to stand out among their competitors to create unique experiences for their buyers. 

This episode covers branding, redesigning processes, encouragement for reinvention, and discusses trends on podcasts, buying experiences, and career advice, that every marketer can use. Check it out!

 

Takeaways:

  • What kind of in-person experience can you provide to your customers in conjunction with the digital marketing that you are doing? 
  • As businesses move into the digital space, they are all starting to look the same. How can your business differentiate itself from the rest?
  • Brands are now more important than ever. A brand is what your company stands for and what your buyers can connect with. It is important to make sure that your brand stands out from your competitors. 
  • As businesses reinvent themselves, they need to factor in that mistakes will be made. Human error is inevitable.
  • To stay competitive, companies need to reinvent themselves to evolve with changes in the market and with the trends of their buyer behaviors.
  • Have the curiosity to go and experience an interesting trend or process, rather than doubting it right away. For example, look at podcasts, short-form video, and Netflix, these are trends that took off that people in the past may have ignored because they said, "That will not take off."
  • Career advice from Geoffrey Colon - Don’t sweat the small stuff and find people to work with that have had experiences with failure and have learned from their past.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • In marketing, trends and processes die out. - This is NOT the case, nothing really dies in marketing. Things just reconfigure and evolve or hybrid processes are created. 
  • Traditional marketing does not work anymore, only digital matters. - Businesses need to do a blend of traditional and digital marketing. The traditional physical touches with buyers still work when properly placed. Businesses need to understand their buyers and know when traditional marketing is needed and when digital marketing is needed.
Marketing Like a Startup Superstar - Steve Kahan - Hard Corps Marketing Show #117

Marketing Like a Startup Superstar - Steve Kahan - Hard Corps Marketing Show #117

January 9, 2020

Do you feel like you are pigeonholed in your corporate job? Do you need some inspiration and are considering moving to a marketing position in the startup world?

A Marketing Leader, Serial Entrepreneur, the author of Be a Startup Superstar, and the CMO of Thycotic, Steve Kahan, gives his recommendations of what to look for in a startup, best practices for website conversion, and stresses the importance of measurement in marketing. This is one episode you do not want to miss!

 

Takeaways:

  • People love to have immediate feedback, consider providing useful self-assessments for your customers in which your company can help them improve their score.
  • In marketing, “always err on the side of giving maximum value” to your customers. - Steve Kahan
  • Marketing is about the metrics. If a marketer is early in their career and they are in a role that is not measured towards its effect on revenue, then they are stunting their career growth.
  • The key to converting leads on your website is to provide superb content that is compelling enough to target buyers.
  • Make it easy for website visitors to access your content and also to get a quote for your product or service.
  • Steve Kahan’s book, Be a Startup Superstar is based on 35 actions and behaviors one should take for success at a startup.
  • When looking for a startup at which to work consider the people that work there, if there is a market for the product or service, is the company selling a product or service you can believe in, and if it is well funded.
  • “Marketing is all about impacting revenue.” - Steve Kahan
  • Career advice from Steve Kahan - Invest in yourself and make sure that you are your most important priority. Schedule time on your calendar each week to take time for yourself whether it is working out, learning something new, or recharging your batteries.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • Companies can’t get great visibility unless they already have lots of customers that are ready to go live and give their success stories in the media. - This is NOT the case. A company can have high visibility through generating their own news, such as providing useful content, like research reports and self-assessments to their customers.
The Marketing Scientist - Daniel McCarthy - Hard Corps Marketing Show #116

The Marketing Scientist - Daniel McCarthy - Hard Corps Marketing Show #116

January 7, 2020

There is a shift happening in departmental dynamics at companies. Marketing is either being given a seat at the table or they are still seen as the print shop for sales.

A Marketing Scientist, Statistician, and the Assistant Professor of Marketing at Emory University, Daniel McCarthy, encourages marketers everywhere that they have the power of metrics to get a seat at the table.

The Marketing Scientist discusses customer retention, revenue forecasting, and cautions about what data points to not place too much faith in. Check it out!

 

Takeaways:

  • A marketer can take customer retention, order rates, basket size, and customer acquisition to provide a revenue forecast for the company.
  • To help build a forecast, one of the most important sources of data is previous transactional behavior, determining what sales are going to look like next year and the year after.
  • “You can’t manage what you can’t measure.” - Daniel McCarthy
  • A base for a customer retention model is to consider that when each customer signs with your company, they each have a different propensity, or level of loyalty, that will determine their retention behavior with your business.
  • When determining whether or not a customer will purchase from your business again, look at their previous transactional behavior. If the customer is still too new, then use the previous transactional behavior from another customer that is of a similar makeup to help forecast.
  • If a marketer only looks at current sales today, they could be ignoring the sales for the future. Consider a long term impact, how do the investments you are making in marketing today affect revenue a year from now?
  • Career advice from Daniel McCarthy - When considering a career path, think in simple terms and evaluate the most efficient path. Be sure to take care of yourself along the way, because it can be difficult to get your health back.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • Finance should have more weight than marketing in a company. - Marketing should have an equal seat at the table. Marketing now has the ability to provide metrics and customer behavioral insights to help provide revenue forecasting that warrants them an equal seat at the table.
  • Customer lifetime value should only be used tactically for measurement. - Customer lifetime value can be leveraged strategically at a high level to govern whether a company should acquire a customer and also influence what the pricing should be.
Fanocracy Marketing - David Meerman Scott - Hard Corps Marketing Show #115

Fanocracy Marketing - David Meerman Scott - Hard Corps Marketing Show #115

January 7, 2020

What are you a fan of? Why do you think you are a fan of that thing? What happens to your brain when you become a fan of something? 

Have you ever thought about how you can create fans for your company?

The Keynote Speaker and Bestselling Author of Freshspot Marketing, David Meerman Scott, challenges marketers to go beyond marketing about their products or services and to focus on their buyers to create genuine human connection. Check out this episode to find out the power of creating fans for your company and how to get started!

 

Takeaways:

  • It is a lot easier to do marketing around your company’s product or service, but may not be as effective. Put in the work and get to know your buyers to frame your marketing around their problems and that human connection.
  • With the way the world is now, people are craving a genuine human connection.
  • Fanocracy is about turning fans into customers and customers into fans. How can your organization grow fans?
  • Neuroscience says that when people become a fan of something, their brain is forming a connection with like-minded people, the individual becomes a part of a tribe. Being a part of a tribe is a survival technique built into humans.
  • The closer you get to someone the more powerful the emotional connection. Public space is over 20 feet away from you, social space is under 20 feet, and personal, cocktail party space, is under four feet away. 
  • The goal is to create experiences with your customers within close proximity to build the connection.
  • A remote or virtual company can create close proximity experiences through video and images. The closer the camera, the greater the connection.
  • The humble selfie picture is powerful. It is authentic and creates the closeness feeling of being within four feet of the photo’s subject. 
  • Consider using images of people at your company and your customers on your website rather than stock images to build the connection with your audience.
  • Career advice from David Meerman Scott - Choose a career that is intellectually stimulating where you can have fun and enjoy yourself.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • The best way to reach your buyer is to market about your product or service. - This is NOT the case. People care about themselves and other people. If your marketing is not working, market towards the problems of your buyers and focus on building a human connection with them.
The Pursuit of Thought Leadership - Daniel Cordell - Hard Corps Marketing Show #114

The Pursuit of Thought Leadership - Daniel Cordell - Hard Corps Marketing Show #114

January 2, 2020

You love what you do, you take in content, get inspired, and then what happens? Do you share what you have learned? Did you ever consider yourself to be a thought leader?

A veteran in interactive design, a marketer, entrepreneur, technologist, and Business Consultant and Marketing Strategist at Cheshire Impact, Daniel Cordell, encourages listeners to invest in those around them and be a thought leader as it pertains to their career.

This episode is filled with inspirational definitions of leadership, professional development ideas, and career advice for every marketer. Check it out!

 

Takeaways:

  • Leadership is about building others up, contributing to something bigger than yourself, and taking initiative. 
  • There are different terms that are associated with leadership. How do those terms apply to your career path?
  • Strive to be in a professional environment where people build each other up.
  • Content is a big part of thought leadership, but it does not have to be the written word. Use what you are passionate about to contribute content whether it is with graphic design, video, photography, podcasts, or creating a video game.
  • Investing in others can turn into a longer relationship for future connections.
  • If you gain the experience of getting certified or earning another level of professional development in your career, share your experience.
  • Think about where you want to develop in your career and then where you want to bring value and pursue those paths.
  • Career advice from Daniel: Build others up in every work environment. Every person you interact with is an opportunity for you to build that person up and to create a life-long relationship.

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • Thought leadership is only for people in positions of leadership. - This is NOT the case. Thought leadership is about taking what content and experiences that you have learned from, inspired you, and how they apply to your career, and then sharing it with others. How can you contribute to those around you in your industry?
  • Only marketing team members with a content background can contribute content. - Compiling content is a team effort, including those outside of the content marketing niche. Content can take the form of video, graphic design, podcasts, development, or a gaming program.
The Marketing Empathy Practice - Brian Carroll - Hard Corps Marketing Show #113

The Marketing Empathy Practice - Brian Carroll - Hard Corps Marketing Show #113

December 26, 2019

In marketing, it is easy to look at the recipients you are scheduling your next email to as numbers. However, those numbers are people and when is the last time you asked yourself if your email is going to provide value to them?

An Entrepreneur, Author, Speaker, Host of the B2B Roundtable Show, and the Founder & CEO of markempa, Brian Carroll, challenges marketers to not get lost in the numbers on their email lists, but to go back to their roots, which is caring for and helping their buyers.

This episode discusses how to apply empathy mapping to your marketing, tactics for getting to know your buyers, and career advice for every marketer. Check it out!

 

Takeaways:

  • Reciprocal altruism is when you do something for someone else without expecting anything in return.
  • Before a marketer sends their next email, they should consider putting themselves in the shoes of their recipient. Does the email connect with something the recipient cares about?
  • If you are not aware of your own feelings, how are you going to be aware of someone else’s?
  • An empathy map has the marketer approach their customer from the lens of what is the customer doing and saying and how are they thinking and feeling?
  • Marketers need to get to know their customers and understand their problems, what they care about, and the language they are using to describe those problems. Listen to some sales calls, do buyer persona interviews, and put in the work.
  • Marketing at the root is figuring out what your buyers care about and then connecting with them in their current state. 
  • Career advice from Brian Carroll: Life is not going from mountain top to mountain top. Be willing to say yes and embrace the uncertainty of life and know that when you feel uncomfortable or the most afraid, that is probably where you are supposed to be.
  • What would you do in marketing or in your career if you were not afraid? How is your fear controlling you?

 

Links:

 

Busted Myths:

  • Trust is something that can be automated. - This is NOT the case. Trust is built overtime. When recipients receive your automated marketing emails, do they feel that you care about them and are trying to provide something valuable? The best marketing feels like helping, so what are you providing to your buyers that can help them in their journey?